montgomerycliftcentral:

Montgomery Clift - Stanley Kubrick (1949 - Glamour Boy in Baggy Pants- LIFE)

(via sadyoungliterarygirls)

mynameispride:

400-484thz:

Salvador Dali drawing a penis on the forehead of a woman and signing it with Picasso’s signature

Life goals

mynameispride:

400-484thz:

Salvador Dali drawing a penis on the forehead of a woman and signing it with Picasso’s signature

Life goals

(via nereid1997)

alpinistoamericano:

weepling:

Mark Rothko, Untitled, 1969

Rothko’s last work before committing suicide.

(via sadyoungliterarygirls)

theniftyfifties:

James Dean pushing a go-kart photographed by Dennis Stock, 1955.

(via wander-lust-ful)

writersandkitties:

Kitty proofreading Jean Paul Sartre.

writersandkitties:

Kitty proofreading Jean Paul Sartre.

(via sadyoungliterarygirls)

#Beckett #Lynch #Waits

theimpossiblecool:

“Knowing you might not make it, in that knowledge courage is born.”

Wiliam S. Burroughs.

likeafieldmouse:

John Knuth - Made in Los Angeles (2013)

"With the help of a huge swarm of flies, John Knuth transforms decay into creation. Flies have long symbolized death and rot in art as well as popular culture. In Medieval times, for example, it was popularly believed flies were born out of carcasses rather than eggs as larvae.  

Knuth, though, emphasizes the flies’ productive role in the larger cycle of life and death. He creates his work by first feeding the flies water mixed with sugar and paint. The flies digest their food mostly outside of their body, Knuth’s flies doing so directly onto the canvas. While digesting, each fly leaves a small mark of pigment, a small piece of the larger record of the swarm.”  

(Text via beautifuldecay)

likeafieldmouse:

Dominik Smialowski - The Pilot’s Melancholy (2012)

James Joyce in Shakespeare and Company, Paris, 1938, with Sylvia Beach and Adrienne Monnier, Ulysses’s publishers.

via oldbooklover

(via sadyoungliterarygirls)

What is neorealism?

shihlun:

Jean-Luc Godard shooting his latest film Adieu au langage
jlgplusjlg:

Portrait de JLG sur le tournage d’Adieu au langage 
Photo : Monique Moser

shihlun:

Jean-Luc Godard shooting his latest film Adieu au langage

jlgplusjlg:

Portrait de JLG sur le tournage d’Adieu au langage 

Photo : Monique Moser

(via photographsonthebrain)

holdentumblr:

Andy Warhol interviews Alfred Hitchcock

[ Originally published in Interview Magazine in September of 1974 ]

Andy Warhol: Since you know all these cases, did you ever figure out why people really murder? It’s always bothered me. Why.
Alfred Hitchcock: Well I’ll tell you. Years ago, it was economic, really. Especially in England. First of all, divorce was very hard to get, and it cost a lot of money.
Andy Warhol: But what kind of person really murders? I mean, why.
Alfred Hitchcock: In desperation. They do it in desperation.
Andy Warhol: Really?….
Alfred Hitchcock: Absolute desperation. They have nowhere to go, there were no motels in those days, and they’d have to go behind the bushes in the park. And in desperation they would murder.
Andy Warhol: But what about a mass murderer.
Alfred Hitchcock: Well, they are psychotics, you see. They’re absolutely psychotic. They’re very often impotent. As I showed in “Frenzy.” The man was completely impotent until he murdered and that’s how he got his kicks. But today of course, with the Age of the Revolver, as one might call it, I think there is more use of guns in the home than there is in the streets. You know? And men lose their heads?
Andy Warhol: Well I was shot by a gun, and it just seems like a movie. I can’t see it as being anything real. The whole thing is still like a movie to me. It happened to me, but it’s like watching TV. If you’re watching TV, it’s the same thing as having it done to yourself.
Alfred Hitchcock: Yes. Yes.
Andy Warhol: So I always think that people who do it must feel the same way.
Alfred Hitchcock: Well a lot of it’s done on the spur of the moment. You know.
Andy Warhol: Well if you do it once, then you can do it again, and if you keep doing it, I guess it’s just something to do.
Alfred Hitchcock: Well it depends whether you’ve disposed of the first body. That is a slight problem. After you’ve committed your first murder.
Andy Warhol: Yes, so if you do that well, then you’re on your way. See, I always thought that butchers could do it very easily. I always thought that butchers could be the best murderers.

It was true that I didn’t have much ambition, but there ought to be a place for people without ambition, I mean a better place than the one usually reserved. How in the hell could a man enjoy being awakened at 6:30 a.m. by an alarm clock, leap out of bed, dress, force-feed, shit, piss, brush teeth and hair, and fight traffic to get to a place where essentially you made lots of money for somebody else and were asked to be grateful for the opportunity to do so?
― Charles Bukowski, Factotum
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